Religion in Rio de Janeiro

Religion in Rio de Janeiro
Rio de Janeiro metropolitan area, according to 2009 researches from Fundação Getúlio Vargas (known as Portuguese: Novo Mapa das Religiões).
 It nowadays ranks first among Brazilian peripheries in Irreligion percentage (23.68%), and it is also the least Roman Catholic among Brazilian metropolitan areas, and trails only Boa Vista among the least Roman Catholic (51–52%) Brazilian capitals (Rio de Janeiro state, 15.95%, simultaneously only trails Roraima, 19.39%, in Irreligion), while Rio de Janeiro city is also the fifth Brazilian capital in the percent of Irreligious population (13.33%), changing nearly nothing since 2000 (while the first, Boa Vista, has 21.16%). It is also the Brazilian capital with the greatest percentage of Spiritists (now about 4–5%), and with substantial numbers in Afro-Brazilian religions and Eastern religions.

Many of the new rising Protestant churches in Brazil are based in Rio de Janeiro, such as the Universal Church of the Kingdom of God, and they are mostly Evangelical or Pentecostal influenced by American movements. They have strong support in many poor peripheries and favelas everywhere in the metropolis (Evangelicals and Pentecostals are 20,25% in Greater Rio de Janeiro excluding the capital and 10,95% in the city proper as of 2009; Afro-Brazilians and Pardos are historically more inclined toward Protestantism than other demographic groups), but there are also many members from other social classes, and are known and criticized for their generally more socially conservative stance (which so far openly influences in Brazilian politics —despite the fact Brazil is constitutionally a secular state— as the so-called bancada evangélica), faith healing and supposedly prosperity theologian and highly proselytizing behavior (as demonstrated in the kick in the saint incident), also supposedly stigmatizing atheists, spiritists, Afro-Brazilian religions and its members, and in a number of cases (such as those of Magno Malta and Silas Malafaia) LGBTs and social liberals which hold visions supporting LGBT rights.